Tyler Perry’s “A Fall from Grace” on Netflix is Quite Possibly the Worst Movie Ever

If you’re looking for a movie with poor acting, a horrible plot and an even worse storyline, look no further than Tyler Perry’s A Fall from Grace on Netflix.


The movie stars Jasmine (Bresha Webb), a public defender known for getting plea deals for her client. She takes on the case of Grace, a churchgoing woman in her fifties accused of killing her younger husband.


The worst of the acting takes place at the beginning of this movie when Jordan (Matthew Law) who is Jasmine’s police officer husband , tries to talk a suicidal woman down from jumping out the window. He screams “no” several times, but there is no conviction in his voice. He does not display the proper emotion or tone for someone witnessing what he is at the moment.


Moreover, the most problematic aspect of this movie is that in an attempt to build suspense, the viewer is shorted on information. To fill the viewer in on some details, Grace tells her story to Jasmine, and then flashbacks unfold. This tactic bores the viewer.


In the end, the viewer finds out what actually happened to Grace’s husband and who else is involved. The action in the movie comes in around this time, but it is too little, too late.


I would give this movie two stars out of five. It is a boring waste of time with lazy writing and even lazier acting.

Netflix’s American Son is an American Fail

Netflix’s American Son centers around an educated Black mother and her estranged white FBI agent husband and their son who is in trouble with the law. For the most part of the film, the audience does not much more about the son’s whereabouts other than he was pulled over by the cops with two other Black friends. Written by trial lawyer Christopher Demos-Brown who is a playwright, the film is less a movie than a too-generously funded play.

In trying to attack stereotypes head-on, the story of this film only furthers them. For instance, this film is based on the myth of the single-Black mother raising a troubled son whose father isn’t around for whatever reason. The myth of the single-Black is not busted in this film, only seasoned with a different form of bias and perpetuated.

From the beginning, Kendra, the mother, has a falling out with the sole cop helping to give her information on her son. While some of the dialogue feels real, most of it seems forced. Instead of coming off as a concerned mother aware of a biased policing system that does not value the lives of Black men, she comes off as a person looking for any opportunity to use the race card. Everyone knows the culture of law enforcement inherently denies Black men equal protection, but this film does not approach the issue in a manner consistent with that lack of equal protection.

Moreover, Kendra spends over half the movie arguing with her estranged husband. He comes off as a jerk who may be a little racist. She comes off as too racially aware to have ever dealt with a man such as him. Yet they stayed together for almost 18 years? How? There is a weak attempt made to explain their union when the two discuss the things they like such as hard work. But is the love of hard work enough to bring together an educated Black woman who is aware of racism and a white FBI agent who is racially indifferent, if not outright racist? That would be a stretch.

While arguing with her husband, Kendra goes off when he uses what she calls “white trash” language, bemoaning the fact that she did all she could to keep her son from using “slang.” She basically contends that she whitened their son up so the world could accept him. Their son is rebelling because he wants to be some sort of artist even though he’s basically a genius and his father wants him to be more practical. It is an age-old tale of parental oppression, and it fails here.

The writer is attempting to point out the prejudices in America that makes being Black a hazard. The writer attempts to raise a play to the level of motion picture. The intentions are there, but they lead to a hell of racial biases and failures.